travels to cracow

Middle ages and polish cuisine

travels to cracow
Polish cuisine is a style of cooking and food preparation originating in or widely popular in Poland.
Polish cuisine has evolved over the centuries to become very eclectic due to Poland's history.

Polish cuisine shares many similarities with other Slavic countries, especially Czech, Slovak, Belarusian, Ukrainian and Russian cuisines.1 It has also been widely influenced by other Central European cuisines, namely German, Austrian and Hungarian cuisines 2 as well as Jewish,3 French, Turkish and Italian culinary traditions.4 It is rich in meat, especially pork, chicken and beef (depending on the region), winter vegetables (cabbage in the dish bigos), and herbs.5 It is also characteristic in its use of various kinds of noodles the most notable of which are kluski as well as cereals such as kasha (from the Polish word kasza).6 Generally speaking, Polish cuisine is hearty and uses a lot of cream and eggs.

The traditional dishes are often demanding in preparation.

Many Poles allow themselves a generous amount of time to serve and enjoy their festive meals, especially Christmas eve dinner (Wigilia) or Easter breakfast which could take a number of days to prepare in their entirety.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_cuisine#History

Forests of Poland

Polish forests cover about 30% of Poland's territory, and are mostly owned by the state.

Western and northern parts of Poland as well as the Carpathian Mountains in the extreme south, are much more forested than eastern and central provinces.1 The most forested administrative districts of the country are: Lubusz Voivodeship (48,9%), Subcarpathian Voivodeship (37,2%), and Pomeranian Voivodeship (36,1%).1 The least forested are: Łódź Voivodeship (21%), Masovian Voivodeship (22,6%), and Lublin Voivodeship (22,8%). Forest in Poland occupy the poorest soil.

Coniferous type accounts for 54.5%, whereas broadleaved type accounts for 45.5% (out of that, alder and riparian forests account for 3.8%).

A number of forested zones are now protected by the Polish government and, in many cases, they have become tourist destinations.

Over the years, many of the largest Polish forests have been reduced in size, and that reflected on the structure of forest inhabitation. Up until the end of the 18th Century, beginning in what is known as the Middle Ages, forests were considered places for travelers and ordinary folk to stay away from, as they were home to bandits and were believed to be inhabited by evil spirits.

Law and order did not apply to forests for many centuries, except for self-policing observed and administered by their inhabitants.
However, the forests did contain numerous woodsmen and their families who made the best of their remote environment.
These woodsmen lived on what the forest could produce, collecting pitch resin for sale ? important as method of illuminating city streets ? logging construction lumber, collecting lime, bees wax, honey, hops, mushrooms and whatever other saleable items could be harvested in the forest and sold in villages outside of it.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forests_of_Poland

Poland: interesting natural places

In Poland, we find a lot of sites that are attractive from the environmental point of view.
Actually, in each province we can find no problem region, which is worth a visit just for that reason.
Certainly the most attractive in terms of natural places, and also the most frequently chosen by tourists regions are mountains.

The highest mountains in Polish is a place where you can really relax, and by the way also to learn about the local wildlife.

Of course, Poland is worth a visit also in other Polish regions: notable, for example Bialowieza Forest and mites.
The sea also find unique natural regions that are worth seeing..

Widok do druku:

travels to cracow